Books

The Baptist’s Head Trilogy (The Blood of the Saints, The Urn, and A Desert of Roses) was first published in 2010. It is the magickal record of two magicians, charting their exploration of how the techniques of chaos magick can be used to achieve the Great Work of Magick, known also as “awakening” or “enlightenment”.

Use the links above to download freely available PDF versions from Internet Archive.



What is the correct relationship between the living and the dead? In what sense do the dead “exist”? How could they “speak” to us, and what might we gain from listening?

These are questions answerable only by magick. Through its use of rituals and visions, Liber Pisces attempts to provide some answers. Whereas spiritualist mediums supposedly relay messages from the dead, this book is concerned not with the contents of such communications, but with their underlying nature and function. It is likely to be of interest to occultists, psychotherapists, or people coming to terms with issues following bereavement.


The Enochian Aethyrs have been part of Western magick since their “discovery” in the 1580s by the Elizabethan magus John Dee and his colleague Edward Kelley. But it is largely to Aleister Crowley, in the early twentieth century, that we owe the concepts and practices surrounding the aethyrs within the western magickal tradition today.

Sefer Aemeth records thirty contemporary visions of the aethyrs, the attempt to interpret them, and the methods employed to obtain them during a six-year investigation of this magickal operation, which has teased and challenged every generation of magickians since Crowley.



Formless Realms is a collection of words and spontaneous charcoal drawings attempting to capture insights and experiences encountered during deep states of meditation.



According to legend, the archangel Raziel stands by God’s throne and writes down divine wisdom into a book he presented to Adam and Eve, after their expulsion from Eden. Since then, Enoch, Noah, and Solomon have all been recipients of writings from this being, the angel of mysteries, whose name means “God’s secrets”.

In this latest manifestation of The Book of Raziel, channelled from the archangel himself, Raziel presents us with allegorical stories, visions, and descriptions of his earthly mission. For the first time, the angel’s own unique personality and his distinctive voice form an important component of his message.



Among these fifteen short stories: a boy with a doomed crush on his computer science teacher; a dying father haunted by strange memories of a beetle; a reclusive writer discovers how to impress a vampire; survivors of the zombie apocalypse find safety in a seaside town; and a bizarre cult that hides beneath the floorboards of suburban homes…

The Albadine and Other Stories blurs the boundaries of literary and genre fiction to produce some unique and disturbing visions.


Liber Detritus is the zeitgeist turned against itself, the preoccupations of our culture repurposed in an attempt to express through the same-old something different.

This collection of cut-ups and collages offers unexpected switches between entrenched positions into an alternative place. By means of nonsense, Liber Detritus delivers us to a different realm where meaning shines out from behind culture, rather than presenting as its product.

This is the perennial realm of the otherwise, of how life might be if it were not what it is. And when contemporary discourse is refracted back through the lens of the otherwise, oddly it starts to sound like the language of prayer…


John Humphrys, Jeremy Paxman, James Naughtie: key figures in the British Media, yet few people realise they sleep rough every night, on the ground in their working clothes, with only a thin blanket. Tonight, that’s where I’m sleeping too, sharing a blanket with Humphrys, until my girlfriend wakes me. She’s a lissom, willowy girl with long curled hair and bright eyes.

“I never knew that newsreaders slept rough,” I mumble.

“Why do you think they’re always banging on about homeless people in the news?” she says…

The Remains of Kenneth Vacuum is 275 tiny stories — perhaps among the most exquisitely strange ever written. “The reader is justified,” writes Frater Geur in his introduction, “to ask what exactly are these passages of writing. Fact or fiction? Entertainment, or a symbolic treatise? The reader will form his or her own opinion, but I would caution against finding too simple an explanation…”


Using occultism to understand the paranormal sounds like diluting water or burying earth, but the aim of Occult Experiments in the Home is to draw upon the theory and practice of modern magick to provide a toolbox of concepts for exploring the relationship between consciousness and the paranormal.

Presenting personal experiences of poltergeists, telepathy, communication with the dead, religious phenomena and astral projection, the essence of this exploration is that the paranormal does not happen only to special people and on rare occasions. To experience the paranormal we need simply turn our attention to the nature of our consciousness itself.

This book describes magic as I know it: teasing, tricky and never quite as expected, and yet it leaves our lives so much richer in colour and meaning. Read it, do it, and take a new look at your world. –Ramsey Dukes.


More to follow. Keep checking back…